NewburyportNews.com, Newburyport, MA

Business

September 17, 2013

Roofing, siding projects are prime opportunities for saving energy

Now that we’re at the end of summer fun, many homeowners turn their attention to projects that need to be completed before winter. Some homeowners plan on reroofing or re-siding their homes. These are substantial projects that may present one-time opportunities to significantly impact comfort and substantially reduce energy costs, while increasing the durability and value of the homes.

As state building energy codes become more rigorous and carbon reduction goals are implemented to avoid climate change, we’ll see significant changes in residential new construction and renovation. Many changes have already happened, and for certain energy-saving home improvements, such as air sealing and insulation, state government and local utilities offer incentives to homeowners. These are compelling reasons to take a serious look at including additional insulation to save energy and hopefully stay ahead of future energy code requirements if you are already planning a new roof or siding project.

So, how do you proceed in a mindful, energy-saving way, reducing carbon and saving money? Unfortunately, adding insulation is not on the mind of most roofing or siding contractors. They will want to do their respective jobs in the traditional way. Siding contractors typically use standard 3/8-inch foam under the siding, and roofers add no insulation whatsoever. If you want to add insulation, as the customer, you will have to demand it; you’ll have to find a contractor who is willing and has the knowledge to do the extra work effectively. This may be a two-step process, hiring both an insulation contractor in conjunction with a siding or roofing company.

There are many ways to add insulation, which not only adds R-value (the measure of conductive heat transfer), but also manages air-movement and moisture through the roofing or siding project, as well as the whole house. Rigid foam board and/or spray foam are oft-used insulating materials that can be incorporated into siding and roofing jobs. If the insulation is installed on the exterior of sheathing, which is a common approach, it must be thick enough to prevent moisture from condensing on the inside of the wall or roof. Roof eaves and wall top-plate transition areas can be challenging and require extra attention to detail.

Text Only | Photo Reprints

Special Features
Port Pics
AP Video
Judge Ponders Overturning Colo. Gay Marriage Ban Airlines Halt Travel to Israel Amid Violence NYPD Chief Calls for 'use of Force' Retraining VA Nominee McDonald Goes Before Congress Bush: Don't Worry, Sugarland Isn't Breaking Up US Official: Most Migrant Children to Be Removed Police Probing Brooklyn Bridge Flag Switch CDC Head Concerned About a Post-antibiotic Era Raw: First Lady Says `Drink Up' More Water Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law Holder Urges Bipartisanship on Immigration Raw: Truck, Train Crash Leads to Fireball US Airlines Cancel Israel Flights Obama Signs Workforce Training Law Crash Victims' Remains Reach Ukraine-held City Diplomatic Push Intensifies to End War in Gaza Cat Fans Lap Up Feline Film Festival Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die Veteran Creates Job During High Unemployment