NewburyportNews.com, Newburyport, MA

Business

May 22, 2012

Lawmakers set to stop grocery price stickers

BOSTON — Grocery stores in Massachusetts would no longer be required to put price tags on each item and could instead deploy price scanners for consumers to use, under long-stalled legislation that quietly cleared the House this month.

If the bill becomes law, Massachusetts would become the last state in the nation to eliminate individual price tag requirement for grocery and food stores. The supermarket industry has fought for years to stop tagging each item; consumer groups say the move is bad for shoppers trying to compare prices.

In order to stop individually pricing items, stores would be required to go through an application process that includes an accuracy check of their scanners and agreeing to sign a waiver that no job losses will result from the change. Stores must also disclose the correct prices of items in a "clear and conspicuous manner." Grocery and other food stores must also still display the price of each item on the shelves, and the legislation (H 4089) specifically details requirements for the shelf pricing.

After clearing the House Ways and Means Committee, the legislation sailed through the House last week on voice votes and without debate during lightly attended informal sessions. According to supporters of the bill, its no-job-loss provision helped unions that had opposed the bill switch to a neutral stance on it.

The Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group (MASSPIRG) said the change will not give consumers enough information to make good buying decisions. Other retailers are not required to individually price items, but big box retailers with grocery departments must sticker each food item under current laws.

"The price sticker is the best way a consumer can check an error at the register. The price sticker enables consumers to make better informed choices," said Deidre Cummings, legislative director for MASSPIRG.

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