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PortWatch

May 16, 2013

'Star Trek': The final frontier? Not a chance

The warp drives on the USS Enterprise are, as usual, on the verge of meltdown in “Star Trek Into Darkness.” Luckily, the entertainment propulsion system for the sci-fi saga is roaring full throttle.

The second entry in the revived franchise is a note-perfect blend of escapist fun and thought-provoking commentary, ensemble drama, comic relief, daredevil action and senses-shattering spectacle. Director J.J. Abrams, who recently was anointed the new master of the “Star Wars” empire, leaves Gene Roddenberry’s galaxy positioned to live very long and prosper like crazy.

Despite its baleful title, “Into Darkness” is fleet-footed and never far from a jovial wink at the audience. It opens with a stupendous chase sequence that out-Spielbergs “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” Kirk (Chris Pine) and Bones (Karl Urban) hotfoot it through a weird/gorgeous scarlet forest. A primitive race of chalk-white primitives barrel after them, flinging spears (the only use of 3-D that has caused me literally to jump out of my seat.) Piling emergency atop crisis, Spock (Zachary Quinto) is trapped inside that ready-to-blow volcano on the horizon, the second hand ticking toward its planet-obliterating explosion. Topside, the sprinting duo hit the deadest of all possible dead ends. The multi-cliffhanger ends with multiple surprises and a sly punch line about the origins of fanboy culture.

Here in a nutshell is the Abrams approach to blockbuster filmmaking. The sequence isn’t a handful of undifferentiated characters amid a crushing concatenation of pyrotechnics. It’s a series of cleverly engineered “What next?” moments, with a surprising, perfectly apt payoff. It is storytelling, always the strongest attribute of the “Star Trek” tradition.

Back on a 23rd-century Earth, Kirk is in hot water. His crew’s heroic but forbidden interference with an alien culture earns him a suspension. His mentor, Adm. Pike (Bruce Greenwood) strips the cocky beginner of his command and sends him back to the academy. But soon the service is in need of every able-bodied man. Starfleet’s London data archive is vaporized (or is it?) by a nefarious rogue officer (or was he?) named John Harrison (or is he?). English star Benedict Cumberbatch, bringing the mandatory Old World pomposity to the villain’s role, flees to the Klingon homeworld Kronos. Since a boots-on-the-ground strike force would turn the Federation’s Klingon cold war hot, Adm. Marcus (Peter Weller) orders the Enterprise to launch missiles from a safe distance. The allusions to domestic terrorism and drone warfare add real-world resonance to the drama.

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