NewburyportNews.com, Newburyport, MA

PortWatch

October 9, 2013

Drama on a budget

'Going Faux' can transform a home's style

Phoebe Taylor’s 20-year-old suburban Atlanta ranch house began plain and “builder-grade.”

A professional decorator, she transformed it with faux wood beams, decorative molding and a gold-spun paint job that looks like “soft marble.” Her vision: “what our dream house would have been if we had gone out and bought it.”

It’s called “Going Faux” — turning homes into something they basically are not through prefab architectural embellishments and eye-tricking wall finishes. Enthusiasts say there’s no reason for even the most budget-conscious among us to live a cookie-cutter existence.

“My house was not an expensive house. But even the million-dollar houses don’t have this kind of detail,” Taylor says, adding that she recently sold the house in just one day.

Other “faux” features to consider include ceiling decals that look like parts of elaborate chandeliers, cabinetry embellishments and painted wainscoting.

“I have seen some trailer homes that have more personality to them thanks to paint, sweat equity, buying some lumber and their owners using their creativity,” says Lee Gamble, a Steamboat Springs, Colo.-based designer and painter who specializes in faux finishes.

Gamble says a homeowner can change anything with desire and patience — even ambitious projects like, say, making the interior of a standard subdivision home look like a cozy Tudor or classic Colonial, or like something out of the rustic West.

The Internet is a DIY decorator’s best friend, she says, offering inspiration and sources for adding architectural and decorative elements to a home.

Next is paint, which Gamble calls “the cheapest way to improve your house” — and it’s about more than just giving the walls new color. Paint can be used to create illusions of architectural elements: For example, you can use blocks of color on walls to create the look of molding, or three variations of one color for a three-dimensional look — an old technique called trompe l’oeil that can make your home look just a little more like the Palace of Versailles.

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