NewburyportNews.com, Newburyport, MA

Local News

January 1, 2014

Terrorist bombings spark Russian Olympic concerns

The suicide bombings in Russia serve as a chilling reminder of what the Winter Olympics represent to terrorists: a high-profile target with more than 2,500 athletes, some of them world-famous, waving the flags of nearly 90 nations.

So, while many Olympic leaders offered reassurance on the day after two bombings 400 miles from Sochi killed at least 31 people, some of those getting ready to compete in the Games spoke of a different reality. They know their security is never a sure thing.

“I am concerned,” said U.S. speedskater Jilleanne Rookard. “I’m scared their security may be involved. I don’t know if I necessarily trust their security forces. But they don’t want a national embarrassment, either. I use that thought to relieve some of my worry. I’m sure they want to save their image and their pride.”

Indeed, the Russians vow the athletes will be safe, even though they will be competing in a city 300 miles away from the roots of an Islamic insurgency that has triggered security concerns for the Games, which start Feb. 7.

The country has spent a record $51 billion preparing for its first Winter Games and has promised to make the Games “the safest in Olympic history.”

Olympic chief Alexander Zhukov said the bombings didn’t spark a need for additional security measures because “everything necessary already has been done.”

Swedish hockey player Johan Franzen of the Red Wings sees things a little differently.

“I’m sure after this, the security will be higher than they intended from the start,” he said.

The threat of terrorism at the Olympics has been in the forefront since 1972, when members of a Palestinian terrorist group invaded the Olympic village and killed 11 members of the Israeli delegation.

Security rose to a new level at the 2002 Salt Lake City Games, which came only five months after the Sept. 11 attacks. Improvements in technology, along with ever-present threats of terrorism, have turned security into a top priority for any country hoping to host the Olympics.

Text Only | Photo Reprints

Port Pics
AP Video
Small Plane Crash in San Diego Parking Lot Busy Franco's Not Afraid of Overexposure Fighting Blocks Access to Ukraine Crash Site Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida Workers Dig for Survivors After India Landslide Texas Scientists Study Ebola Virus Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow Southern Accent Reduction Class Cancelled in TN Raw: Deadly Landslide Hits Indian Village Obama Chides House GOP for Pursuing Lawsuit New Bill Aims to Curb Sexual Assault on Campus Russia Counts Cost of New US, EU Sanctions 3Doodler Bring 3-D Printing to Your Hand Six PA Cops Indicted for Robbing Drug Dealers Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways
Special Features