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Local News

July 2, 2013

15 is enough for the ACC for now

(Continued)

“From an athletic perspective, I think it’s more than fair to say this is the strongest collection of basketball programs that has ever been assembled in one conference,” Swofford said. “And our potential from a football standpoint is truly unlimited.”

On the football side, Louisville is coming off one of its most successful seasons, capped by a victory against Florida in the Sugar Bowl. Syracuse and Pittsburgh haven’t been made much noise nationally in football for most of the last decade, though Fisher said ACC football is better with the arrival of the Panthers and Orange this year and Cardinals next.

“You’re talking about a league that can compete for national championships,” said Fisher, whose Seminoles are the defending ACC champions and finished No. 10 in the country last season.

But while conference realignment has mostly been driven by football and the enormous amount of revenue that comes with it, the ACC has been careful to continue to cultivate the sport that it is most famous for: men’s basketball.

“Give the commissioner credit because when they went to expand this time, these were basketball decisions,” Brey said.

ACC football has been generally perceived as the weakest of the five major football conferences. The league hasn’t won a national title in football since Florida State in 1999 and its record in BCS games is 3-13.

“What we are striving to do is to be known as the strongest and best across the board,” Swofford said. “Nothing wrong with being really good in both.

“I don’t think the conference has to have a label per se. That usually has to do with where you’ve had the most success from a national perspective historically. Our league has had more national success historically in basketball than in football, though we’ve had our success in football as well.”

For Pittsburgh and Syracuse the process of changing conferences started, at least publicly, in 2010. The ACC invited the two of them the weekend of Sept. 17.

Still, this day was anything but anticlimactic for the Panthers and Orange.

“As much as we’ve planned and we’re excited about it, this became real for us today, and we’re making a big deal about it,” Pitt Athletic Director Steve Pederson said.

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