NewburyportNews.com, Newburyport, MA

Local News

October 30, 2013

One win away from Fenway Park's proudest day

BOSTON — Ted Williams was just 11 days old, the Green Monster still was made of wood and there were no such things as “Pesky’s Pole” or the red seat in Row 37 of Section 42 the last time the Boston Red Sox won a World Series-clinching game here at historical Fenway Park.

Just 15,238 fans were in attendance to celebrate that Game 6 clincher, which lasted only 1 hour, 46 minutes.

Red Sox right-hander Carl Mays hurled a complete game, allowing just one run while also going 1 for 2 with a walk and run scored. Mays, the great Babe Ruth and the Boston Red Sox were 2-1 victors over the Chicago Cubs on Sept. 11, 1918, to win the World Series inside of then 6-year-old Fenway Park.

Here we are 95 years later. Fenway Park is 101 years old. Mays has been dead 42 years and Ruth 65 years. Williams, then an infant, passed away 11 years ago. And the Red Sox today get their third chance since 1918 to clinch a World Series here on 4 Yawkey Way inside the oldest ballpark in the major leagues.

Boston enters today’s Game 6 against the St. Louis Cardinals here at Fenway with a 3-2 series lead. Sox right-hander John Lackey, who won clinching-Game 7 of the 2002 World Series as a rookie for the Angels, will face Cardinals rookie Michael Wacha, who beat Lackey in Game 2 last week and is 4-0 with a 1.00 ERA in four postseason starts.

Taking into account the 95-year home-field drought (during which the Sox have clinched two World Series on the road, 2004, ‘07), how Sox players rallied around this city during the Boston Marathon Bombings tragedy and also all the historical moments that have happened inside these Fenway walls since Sept. 11, 1918, we’re watching history unfold in front of our eyes ... win or lose.

“I think what’s really built over the course of this season, I think our fans have appreciated the way we’ve gone about playing the game,” Red Sox manager John Farrell said at Fenway yesterday. “I think they’ve witnessed guys that care for one another. And in return, the way they’ve demonstrated their appreciation, the energy that they create in here, we have certainly fed off of that. ... So if we happen to be able to share it with them, that would be great. But we’ve got to take care of business first.”

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