Black History month is almost over. This annual event, sparked a memory. When I was a young lieutenant, I volunteered to serve as my unit’s race relations officer. I was subsequently informed by my commanding officer that I could not perform the duties associated with the post because I was …

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Editor’s note: This is one in a continuing series of guest opinions about fostering environmental stewardship. The current columns focus on the perspectives of Youth Corps members and other young people about the future and the importance of stewardship. The series is coordinated by ACES, th…

If I could get a do-over, a mulligan if you will, I would have been on the winning side of the plastic bag ban vote as a city councilor a few years back. Why wasn’t I? Well, in short, my research then was not on the side of the ban. Too many paper bags were being used in neighboring towns th…

First Commune, now Plum Island Coffee Roasters. And I’m still reeling from the loss of Greta’s Great Grains.

Salisbury, Rowley and Newbury are included in the Triton Regional School District while Amesbury, Newburyport, West Newbury and other surrounding towns have separate school districts. They all are great communities filled with kind and wonderful people. 

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"The extreme willingness of adults to go to almost any lengths on the command of an authority constitutes the chief finding of my study and the fact most urgently demanding an explanation.”

As a practicing architect for 28 years and a resident of Newburyport for 18, I have worked with many businesses in town as well as schools in New England. I also operate in the role of owner’s representative, specifically to assess the feasibility of projects. This work informs my perspectiv…

Editor’s note: This is one in a continuing series of guest opinions about fostering environmental stewardship. This is an introduction to future columns sharing the perspectives of our youths about the future and the importance of stewardship. The series is coordinated by ACES, the Alliance …

This year’s Martin Luther King Jr. holiday was the happiest since its inception. There is new hope among the Black population after so many disappointing tries at overturning the pesky vestiges of Jim Crow.

New Year’s resolutions are usually concerned with losing weight, exercising more and eating healthier. Most of them last about as long as a plate of brownies in a kindergarten class.

Editor’s note: This is one in a continuing series of guest opinions about fostering environmental stewardship and addressing the impact of COVID-19. The series is coordinated by ACES, the Alliance of Climate and Environmental Stewards.

As we reach the end of January, I’m guessing a few things in our lives haven’t changed. New year’s resolutions are likely history, masks are still a must, we’ll be eagerly waiting to catch the groundhog’s shadow in a few days and some guy named Tom Brady is in the Super Bowl again. The evolu…

A year ago this week, a woman met me in a downtown coffee shop, visibly upset: She had just learned that June had passed away.

I am writing in response to the article published on Jan. 21 titled “Newburyport officials review Low Street wetlands.” I attended and participated in the productive meeting.

There’s been considerable discussion about the proposed purchase of Low Street property across from the middle school for $255,000 from the state.

On Sunday, Jan. 17 I had the privilege to attend a virtual service led by Rev. Rebecca Bryan from the Universalist Unitarian Church commemorating and celebrating the life of Martin Luther King Jr. It was a terrific and inspiring event.

Over the past 70 years, journalism has been a central part of my life — as a daily reader of newspapers, as a reporter, as a teacher, and as a continuing guest OpEd columnist.

This is pretty simple: President Donald Trump is not only unfit for the office he holds — that’s been true for four years — but he’s now actively a danger to the republic. Yes, there are only two weeks remaining in his term, but he should be removed from office.

This week’s warning by all 10 living former U.S. defense secretaries that the military must not be used to determine an election is a stunning pushback against President Donald Trump’s drive to retain power.

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Editors note: This is one in a continuing series of guest opinions about fostering environmental stewardship. The series is coordinated by ACES, the Alliance of Climate and Environmental Stewards. www.aces-alliance.org.

Of all the sensational events of 2020, the most telling was barely noticed, a piece of paper no more detailed or mindful than a nodding head: The Republican National Convention’s nonplatform.

Pundits have been commenting on the Decline of the West since the German philosopher Oswald Spengler published a book by that title in 1918. The Western world may not be as dominant as it once was, but its decline has been exaggerated.

Editor's note: This is one in a continuing series of guest opinions about fostering environmental stewardship. The series is coordinated by ACES, the Alliance of Climate and Environmental Stewards: www.aces-alliance.org.

As Donald Trump’s bumper-car presidency careens and crashes through its historically unprecedented final days (see also: final daze), his closest advisers and newbie conspiracy confidants have been sometimes convening in panic and at other times ducking and dodging to avoid their unhinged leader.

If you pay attention to global affairs, you know that increasing numbers of people believe US leadership in the world is coming to an end and the West more broadly is being eclipsed. I think these predictions are exaggerated, but they are not without some basis. Our challenges have grown. It…

If you do not see the remarkable conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn at the time of the winter solstice (Dec. 21), you may not see it again. I

My husband and my mother bought me a Christmas present together last year around this time. That wouldn't be strange except my mom passed away in 2001.

Editor’s note: This is one in a continuing series of guest opinions about fostering environmental stewardship and addressing the impact of COVID-19. The series is coordinated by ACES, the Alliance of Climate and Environmental Stewards.

The United States and Europe led the world in pursuit of freedom and democracy in the post-World War II period. Relying on shared values, including a commitment to democratic governance and human rights, we shaped an international order that improved life for people around the world.

Over the weekend of Nov. 7, Pfizer Inc. announced they had developed a vaccine that was 95% effective against COVID-19. The company that I retired from in 1995, after 40 years of service, had accomplished the impossible. My admiration for the company knows no bounds. Pfizer has always placed…

editor's pick

These are memories of the Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor — not those of a veteran, but of a 5-year-old living in Honolulu, the son of Jesse H. Motes Jr., a Navy lieutenant and gunnery officer serving on a destroyer in Pearl Harbor.

When the history of this era is written, special attention should be reserved for the prominent U.S. politicians who dismissed or misrepresented the COVID-19 pandemic for political purposes.

As we sat down in the dining room, just the two of us, for our scaled-back 2020 Thanksgiving dinner, the striking features were all the empty seats around the table and those who would have filled them.

Editor’s note: This is one in a continuing series of guest opinions about fostering environmental stewardship and addressing the impact of COVID-19. The series is coordinated by ACES, the Alliance of Climate and Environmental Stewards.

The COVID-19 pandemic has produced staggering levels of suffering and loss. It has caused nearly 260,000 deaths in the United States while devastating the national economy. In addition, our failure to respond effectively has damaged America’s standing in the world.

Editor’s Note: John Hancock, third governor of Massachusetts, issued this proclamation of a day of thanksgiving to be observed Dec. 11, 1783. It was issued following the Treaty of Paris ending the Revolutionary War, and the observance would roughly coincide with the British evacuation of New York.

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